Tag Archive: short stories


Previously published short stories combined into one collection here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004RPTJ4M for the low, low price of $1.00. Seriously, skip the dollar menu at Micky D’s and buy my book.

It’s much less fattening.

If I include the names Charlie Sheen and Lindsay Lohan in here, I figure I can include them in my post tags, and then I might get more hits… right???

Read This Book!

So Gina Holmes new book, Crossing Oceans, is going to be released on May 1st. And you should buy it. Just do it. You know you want to!

http://chipmacgregor.typepad.com/main/2010/03/guest-blogger-thinking-about-writing-communities.html

Don’t believe me? Check here: http://www.chipmacgregor.com/

Guest Blogging

Feel free to check out my guest blog at Chip MacGregor’s site: http://chipmacgregor.typepad.com/.

After GooglingĀ Chip’s name for an appropriate descriptor, I came up with “the Simon Cowell of the Christian publishing world.” Thank you, Jennifer Schuchmann. šŸ˜‰

In all kindness, he’s wicked smart, he knows the Christian publishing business, and for some reason, he allowed me to post my ramblings on his blog. Maybe he’s just too excited about the Colts playing in the Super Bowl this Sunday to care about the real world!

Okay, first, I am in love with Tobias Wolff’s reading voice: http://www.newyorker.com/online/2009/05/11/090511on_audio_wolff

As for “Emergency”…

I appreciate the language in it, i.e. “the road we were lost on cut straight through the middle of the world,” “the tang of evergreens stabbing us,” “the only light visible was a streak of sunset flickering below the hem of the clouds.” And they continue. I love the beautiful word choices. I love the big ideas combined with the minute details. I wish I could write like that.

I also appreciate the story–I am reminded of Kerouac’s The Road and Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men. A never-endingĀ journey and an overt concern for bunnies. I love lines like this: “The bunnies weren’t a problem yet, or they had already been a problem and were already forgotten.” Apparently,Ā I have a fascination with writer’s messing with my sense of time. Or I did have a problem with that, but I don’t now. Or, I am going to have a problem with it, but I don’t yet. =)

But… really… must we have the use of drugs? I find a bit of magic removed from stories when writers rely on the use of a good trip. Maybe it’s that I listenedĀ to the stories my dad told about his clients (he’s a substance abuse counselor), or maybe it’s my Baptist upbringing. Either way, I think magic is so much more fun when there is no explanation, or when the explanationĀ is new, different–not drugs. On the other hand, Wolff thinks that because the story is so tightly written that it is different fromĀ a normal “tripping” story. I can see that, but I would question the necessity of the drugs.

In other news, my sister is going to save lives. She is in nursing school. šŸ˜‰

Books Are Awesome!

http://emergingwriters.typepad.com/emerging_writers_network/2009/12/holiday-shopping-guide-sarah-joy-freese.html

I just finished reading Raymond Carver’s “Neighbors”, and I found myself drawn into minimalist fiction once again. Initially, I wasn’t sure what to do with the dialogue, as I don’t remember “The Swimmer” including that much. However,Ā Carver establishes a nice rhythm with it, and it is not expositional.

The pattern of “Neighbors” and “The Swimmer” is similar. It starts with the protagonist completing an activity (i.e. feeding a cat or swimming in his neighbor’s pools) and progressively makes that activity more and more awkward. It makes me wonder if Carver’s other stories are similar or if ever he experiments in a style that is more difficult for him.

Also, I appreciate Carver’s (okay, I’m going to say it)… “handrails”… throughout his story. Actually, I enjoy that his said handrails sometimes lead to nowhere. For example, initially I assumed the cat moved the story forward for Bill. Then, I assumed it was the Stone’s apartment. Towards the end, the reader realizes that it is not just Bill who is changing but also Arlene.Ā  Finally, the key becomes a hindranceĀ for Bill and Arlene not being able to enter the apartment together. Is this because that neither of them were supposed to be in the apartment together? If Bill and Arlene were ever jointly in their neighbor’s apartment, would they have the same experiences as they have had separately? Also, it seems as if they are leaning into each otherĀ at the end–realizing that each other is all they have… or, is it that they are leaning into the door to force it open? What will happen on the other side of that door? Why do I care more about what happens on the other side of the door than I do about the main characters?

Overall, 4 gold stars for Carver. Not five because “The Swimmer” is a million times better, and I prefer swimming over apartments.

Umm… clearly, you should submit here. Clearly.

http://shop.notesandgracenotes.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7&Itemid=11.