As Nakamura expanded her ideas on race, identity, and women, using terms such as “First World” and “Fourth World” to further define and discuss (create?) Internet boundaries, I once again struggled with the seeming elusiveness of her text. While, she did discuss culturally relevant movies, I have to wonder how these movies directly relate to the Internet. As we discussed in class, movies (the camera) is from a male angle/perspective. How DOES Nakamura fit in as an observer? In watching those two films, she automatically places herself in the position of a male. So, can she even objectively discuss the films without positioning herself as a white male?

Further, identity, identity, identity. Just what is identity? What is my identity? As a female on the Internet, how do my random musings fit within the grand scheme of blogging, writing, and the World Wide Web. I am certainly limited in my technological experiences, preferring to send my computer to the oh-so-grand and EXPENSIVE Geek Squad. Also, my writing comes from the perspective of a female. Am I, by contributing to the Internet entering a male society, thus making the Internet just one part of my life, as compared to something through which I am able to create and express? Or, because the Internet is within the dominant male gaze, do I further define myself by putting my writing within this world, thus allowing men (and women) to observe. Read my writing. Count my spelling errors. Notice my split-infinitives. And think my avatar is just as hot and tempting as I am.

Elizabeth included a quote, which I would also like to leave you with, as I believe that it cannot be read over and over again quite enough: “The trope of transplantation does evoke a particularly American technique and discourse of dealing with differences: assimilation. Just as global capitol can effortlessly assimilate traffic in information, corporate and public identities, and the digital encoding that enables the eminent portability of these things, so too can the western male subject of the future incorporate racial difference.”

Hmm…

¬†And one question that I find myself coming back to: How are young adults and their interactions on the Internet working within their identities? I guess more specifically, are young adult identities (and their view on their identities) different than adult views because of the Internet? Will they eventually become different? How can adults speak to children about their identity when most adults are not as technological or Internet savvy as most children? And the list could continue…

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